Gatherings at Orange

Gatherings can go ahead, including weddings and civil union ceremonies, faith-based gatherings, and funerals and tangihanga.

Key points

  • There are no capacity limits for indoor or outdoor gatherings.
  • You do not need to wear a face mask at a gathering, but it is encouraged.
  • Workers and volunteers at gatherings must wear face masks — unless they are exempt.

There are no capacity limits

There are no limits on the number of people who can attend an indoor or outdoor gathering.

Events have different rules to gatherings. Events control access by using tickets, registration, a fee or another way of controlling entry. For example, a ticketed concert held at a place of worship is an event.

Events at Orange


Serving food and drink

You can serve food and drink at your gathering. People at the gathering do not need to sit down to eat or drink.

If your gathering is at a hospitality venue

If you have exclusive use of the venue, then you can follow the gathering rules.

If you do not have exclusive use of the venue, and you are mixing with members of the public, for example at a restaurant, you need to follow hospitality advice.

Hospitality at Orange


Face masks

You do not need to wear a face mask when attending a gathering, but it is encouraged.

Workers and volunteers at gatherings must wear face masks — unless they are exempt.

Performers and formal speakers do not need to wear a face mask when performing or speaking. At indoor gatherings, they are encouraged to wear face masks when not performing or speaking.

When to wear a face mask


Keep up healthy habits

Healthy habits help protect you, your whānau and others from catching or spreading COVID-19. Examples include:

  • wear a face mask indoors
  • stay home when sick
  • open windows to let out stale air
  • wash or sanitise your hands
  • physically distance from people you do not know.

Keep up healthy habits


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