Get tested for COVID-19

If you have cold, flu or COVID-19 symptoms, call Healthline, your doctor or iwi health provider. They will tell you if you should get a COVID-19 test.

Who should get a test

If you’re unwell

If you have cold, flu or COVID-19 symptoms, call:

  • Healthline for free on 0800 358 5453
  • your doctor or Nurse Practitioner, or
  • your iwi health provider.

A health professional will let you know the next steps and if you should get a test.

COVID-19 symptoms

Locations of interest for the Auckland border-related cases are available on the Ministry of Health website. 

For contact tracing purposes, anyone who attended one of the locations listed during the relevant timeframes is considered to be a contact.

Out of an abundance of caution, we are asking individuals to follow the instructions in the table if they visited these locations during the relevant times.

Remember to check what type of contact you are, and what you should do.

Locations of interest in Auckland, and what you need to do if you're a contact (external link)

Where to get a test

If you need a test, you can get one at:

  • your general practice (GP) — call ahead before you turn up
  • a Community Testing Centre.

Community Testing Centre locations by district health board (external link)

Search for a testing location near you (external link)

Testing locations in Auckland

Auckland testing locations (external link)

Getting tested

Healthline or your doctor will tell you what to do if you need to get tested.

If you have symptoms and get tested, stay home until you have a negative test result.

COVID-19 tests are free

If you've been told you should get a test, COVID-19 tests are free of charge. This applies regardless of your citizenship, immigration status, nationality or level of medical insurance coverage.

You may need to pay for a test if it’s for the purpose of entering another country.

Getting a pre-departure COVID-19 test

If you are asked to pay for a COVID-19 test, please report it to your district health board or primary health organisation.

You will not be charged for your care if you test positive.

Personal information

You will need to provide contact details so that your results can be sent to you.

You do not need to have an NHI number or ID to get tested. But it’s helpful to have your NHI number with you when you get tested.

How to find your NHI number (external link)

You can have a support person

You can ask someone to help you get to your test and be with you during your test.

If you are very unwell and advised by Healthline or your doctor that you need to be assessed or tested at a hospital, you can ask someone to help you get there. If you need someone with you at the hospital, you or your support person should call ahead and discuss this with the doctor or nurse at the hospital.

If you do not have a visa

Everyone can get tested — you do not need to be a New Zealand citizen or resident. The test is still free, and you will not be charged for care if you test positive. But, you may need to pay for a test if it’s for the purpose of entering another country.

No information will be shared with Immigration New Zealand even if you test positive.

Getting the results

When you are tested, you will be told how and when to expect your results. Whether you test negative or positive, you will receive your results.

If you test positive, the Ministry of Health and your local public health unit will call you to discuss your results. They will advise you what to do next.

What to expect if you test positive

How testing works

If you need to be tested for COVID-19, a sample is taken from you.

There’s more than 1 way to take a sample. The most common way is to swab the back of your nose. A swab is like a small cotton-bud but with a longer stick.

For some people this is a tickle, others find it a bit uncomfortable.

Help protect healthcare workers when getting tested

If you get tested, we need your help to keep healthcare workers safe. That means continuing to cough and sneeze into your elbow, and staying 2 metres away from other people wherever possible.

Follow any instructions you get, like turning up on time, calling ahead or waiting in your car. 

The people testing you may wear protective equipment likes gowns or face coverings. This is nothing to worry about, it helps protect them and everyone they’re testing.

Detailed assessment and testing information from the Ministry of Health (external link)

Getting tested if you work at the border or in managed isolation and quarantine

The Ministry of Health has information on testing for those who work at our ports or managed isolation and quarantine.

Information on getting tested if you work at the border (external link)

Testing if you're leaving New Zealand

Some countries require travellers to confirm a negative COVID-19 test before they leave New Zealand. You can check the requirements of the country you are travelling to, by contacting their local high commission, embassy or consulate in New Zealand.

Getting a pre-departure COVID-19 test

Pre-departure testing if you're travelling to New Zealand

If you're travelling to New Zealand, you must have a negative COVID-19 test result before the scheduled departure of your first international flight. Travellers from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific islands do not need to get pre-departure tests.

You will need to have had both your COVID-19 sample taken and your result returned no more than 72 hours before the scheduled departure time of your first international departure.

Check the requirements for pre-departure testing for travellers to New Zealand

Testing data in New Zealand

The Ministry of Health publishes data on:

  • current COVID-19 cases
  • COVID-19 case demographics
  • source of COVID-19 cases
  • testing for COVID-19.

This data helps us measure New Zealand’s recovery from COVID-19 and how to continue to respond in the best way. It also helps keep track of who is being tested, including vulnerable communities or at-risk groups with underlying health conditions.

COVID-19 testing data on the Ministry of Health website (external link)

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