Alert Level changes

Tāmaki Makaurau is at Alert Level 2. The rest of Aotearoa is at Alert Level 1.

Maintaining our tikanga hauora and adhering to our relevant Alert Levels will help break any potential chains of transmission and prevent the spread of  COVID-19.

Whānau living in Tāmaki – Alert Level 2

  • Whānau can go to work and school if they aren’t māuiui.
  • Kura, kōhanga and puna reo are open for our tamariki.
  • Hui and gatherings are restricted to 100 people.
  • Whānau are asked to check out the locations of interest here to see if they need to stay home and get tested.
  • Face coverings must be worn on buses, trains and most ferries.

Locations of interest (external link)

Learn more about Alert Level 2

Whānau living elsewhere in Aotearoa – Alert Level 2

  • Whānau can still go to work and school if they aren’t māuiui.
  • Kura, kōhanga and puna reo remain open for our tamariki.
  • Hui and gatherings are now restricted to 100 people.
  • Travel into Tāmaki is now restricted.
  • Whānau are asked to check out the locations of interest here to see if they need to stay home and get tested.

Locations of interest (external link)

Learn more about Alert Level 2

Gatherings at Alert Level 2

At Alert Level 2 whānau and friends can connect, but restrictions are still in place to manage the risk and spread of COVID-19.

The general guidance for no physical contact, including harirū, hongi, kissing, and hugging, remain in place — for those who don’t live together and aren’t whānau or close friends.

He kupu āwhina i ngā marae | Guidance for marae

These guidelines were developed to clarify public health measures and support marae to make their own decisions for the safety and wellbeing of their whānau, hapū, and iwi.

We acknowledge that many iwi have already put together COVID-19 response plans for their hapū and marae. Marae should contact their tribal authority in the first instance if they have further questions.

Guidance for marae

Looking after our whānau

Iwi, hapū and Māori organisations have led decision-making in our communities to support and ensure whānau are safe and protected from any risk of COVID-19 transmission.

This has included adjusting tikanga and cultural practices such as suspending harirū and hongi, kissing and hugging to maintain physical distance, and using tools such as video conferencing to support hui, tangihanga and wānanga.

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